Mint News Blog

News, Information, and Commentary on US Mint Products

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

2009 Proof Set


The US Mint has just posted the product page for the 2009 Proof Set. This provides collectors with a confirmed price and first glimpse of this year's annual proof set.

The 2009 Proof Set will contain a whopping eighteen different coins. This is an increase of four coins from the prior year. To accommodate the extra coins, the US Mint has added yet another lens (plastic case) for a total of four. The first lens contains the Lincoln Cents, the second contains the quarters, the third contains the Presidential Dollars, and the fourth contains the remaining coins.

The coins included in the set are as follows:

4 - 2009 S Proof Lincoln Cents - Birthplace, Formative Years, Professional Life, Presidency
1 - 2009 S Proof Jefferson Nickel
1 - 2009 S Proof Roosevelt Dime
6 - 2009 S Proof District of Columbia & U.S. Territories Quarters - District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, US Virgin Islands, Northern Mariana Islands
1 - 2009 S Kennedy Half Dollar
4 - 2009 S Proof Presidential Dollars - William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, James K. Polk, Zachary Taylor
1 - 2009 S Native American Dollar

The 2009 S Proof Lincoln Cents will be struck with the composition originally used for the first Lincoln Cents issued in 1909. The alloy consists of 95% copper, 3% zinc, and 2% tin. The US Mint has stated that this 95% copper (bronze) composition will be used for all 2009 Lincoln Cents included in annual sets as well as the upcoming 2009 Lincoln Coin & Chronicles Set.

The 2009 Proof Sets are priced at $29.95 and will go on sale June 1, 2009 at 12:00 Noon ET. No ordering limits are indicated on the product page posted on the US Mint's website. You can view the product page here. You can also check out the US Mint's subscription page, which indicates the composition of the Lincoln Cents. (The main product page does not include this information.) The subscription page is now showing information for the 2010 set.

There has definitely been a lot of anticipation for this year's proof set. The main driver has been the inclusion of the 95% copper Lincoln Cents. While the zinc 2009 Lincoln Cents struck for circulation will each have a mintage in the hundreds of millions, the copper versions produced for collectors will have mintages in the low millions.

An interesting side note, the US Mint has already released two separate sets which contain 2009 proof coins. These were the 2009 Presidential Dollar Proof Set containing the four Presidential Dollars and the 2009 District of Columbia & U.S. Territories Quarters Proof Set containing the six quarters. Each set was priced at $14.95. If you purchased them both, you would have received ten proof coins for a total price of $29.90. By waiting for the full 2009 Proof Set to be issued, you get the remaining eight coins for only 5 cents.

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39 Comments:

At May 19, 2009 at 3:07 PM , Blogger astroguy said...

Fairly annoying with the inclusion of yet another lens in the set. I'm guessing it'll be the same for this year's silver proof set.

I love your last bit about how the DC+Territories and the president proof sets together are only 5ยข less than the full year's proof set. :-)

 
At May 19, 2009 at 3:20 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

wish I could just order the four proof cents for much less and skip all the other stuff I don't want. It does come in it's own lens.

 
At May 19, 2009 at 3:50 PM , Anonymous microdon said...

So you just want the four proof cents? I suspect that if you buy enough sets and break out some of the cents from them, once the proof sets sell out, you could get enough premium from sale of the cents to get your money back and then some. Indeed, the proof sets may be the only way for coin collectors to buy just the proof cents, as the highly anticipated Lincoln Chronicles Set will not be broken up, so scarce will its numbers be.

 
At May 19, 2009 at 5:48 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

much more of the formative years rolls available. Seems to be re-sparking the frenzy for the log cabin penny and driving prices back up.

 
At May 19, 2009 at 7:46 PM , Anonymous Yosemite Sam said...

$30 bucks for a clad proof set!

Well most software releases contain ever-higher percentages of bloat; the Mint subscribes to those precepts with with their own bloated releases ... they're going to have to update their collectors' boxes yet again, but what the hey, it will probably be a hot set with the pure copper pennies and Ter'toire quarters and all ...

 
At May 19, 2009 at 7:58 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Does everyone think these will be popular due the set containing the lincoln penny's based on the demand for the other penny's.

 
At May 20, 2009 at 2:11 AM , Blogger greg said...

I think the $29.95 tag is a bit high, but I think the mint will have no problem in selling out of these. I'll take 20 sets and bust up 5 to get out what people what/need.

 
At May 20, 2009 at 9:02 AM , Blogger limalo said...

Hi, Michael and all,

After the 2009 Proof Set is issued, shouldn't there also be a 2009 Uncirculated Set and a 2009 Silver Proof Set? Seems to me that there are all three each year. If the Mint follows what they've done in the past, these sets should be produced as well. If so, won't these sets provide another opportunity to get the four Lincoln cents from 2009? Will those Lincoln cents also be with the 95% copper and will they also have the S Mint mark? Seems to me, they will also be copper and have the S mark. Any thoughts if this will happen, when and cost. Thanks.

LL

 
At May 20, 2009 at 9:03 AM , Blogger limalo said...

Hi, Michael and all,

After the 2009 Proof Set is issued, shouldn't there also be a 2009 Uncirculated Set and a 2009 Silver Proof Set? Seems to me that there are all three each year. If the Mint follows what they've done in the past, these sets should be produced as well. If so, won't these sets provide another opportunity to get the four Lincoln cents from 2009? Will those Lincoln cents also be with the 95% copper and will they also have the S Mint mark? Seems to me, they will also be copper and have the S mark. Any thoughts if this will happen, when and cost. Thanks.

LL

 
At May 20, 2009 at 9:25 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The uncirculated Mint set will have the P and D copper Lincolns, not an S.

The silver proof set will have the same Lincolns as the clad proof set.

 
At May 20, 2009 at 10:36 AM , Anonymous Dude said...

I am just speculating at this point, but I believe only the "s" mint mark of the Lincoln pennies will be struck in copper. Any other thoughts?

 
At May 20, 2009 at 11:23 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Dude, on the US Mint catalog website, click on Subscriptions, then click on the Uncirculated Coin Set Subscription. You'll see in the product description that the 2009 set will have 95% copper cents.

 
At May 20, 2009 at 1:42 PM , Blogger Lasloo said...

Why does that seem "not quite right" for the uncirculated set to have COPPER pennies. I agree, the subscription page for the uncirculated set says that. But then its not truly the "uncirculated" version of the pennies, right? So, we'll be able to get P and D mint versions of the COPPER penny!?!?

 
At May 20, 2009 at 1:56 PM , Blogger Michael said...

As far as I know, the Uncirculated Mint Sets issued by the Mint will contain the 95% copper versions as a previous commenter said.

These will also differ from the coins issued for circulation since they will have the "satin finish" that the US Mint uses for Mint Set coins.

 
At May 20, 2009 at 3:21 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I realize that this post probably doesn't belong here and I apologize in advance, but can anyone give me a link to a website or other resource that lists the US Mint Product Codes and their associated descriptions? For example, BA3 is the mint's product code for the American Buffalo 2008 Celebration Coin.

I've searched and searched using Google to no avail. Thanks in advance!

 
At May 20, 2009 at 7:12 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Due to the Lincolns, these will sell extremely well...my humble opinion!

 
At May 21, 2009 at 7:50 AM , Blogger Michael said...

In response to this question-

"can anyone give me a link to a website or other resource that lists the US Mint Product Codes and their associated descriptions? For example, BA3 is the mint's product code for the American Buffalo 2008 Celebration Coin.

I've searched and searched using Google to no avail. Thanks in advance!"

What I have done when I need to find a product code is use one of the advanced search strings on Google.

Try entering this in the search box:

BA3 site:catalog.usmint.gov

It will search pages of the US Mint's online catalog for "BA3". Most older product pages are still indexed, so this will usually work.

 
At May 21, 2009 at 8:23 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks Michael. What I am trying to do is find the product codes for products that I purchased that the mint no longer sells (e.g., a 2000 Proof Gold Eagle, etc.). I am putting together a spreadsheet that has this information. I guess there is not database out there with this information?

 
At May 21, 2009 at 8:26 AM , Blogger Michael said...

Unfortunately, there is no comprehensive database that I am aware of.

 
At May 21, 2009 at 10:42 AM , Anonymous Michael A said...

I, too, have been putting together a spreadsheet of the coins and sets I've been collecting from the Mint. Nice to have this for cataloging purposes. Sure wish they had this information already available.

 
At May 21, 2009 at 3:59 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Michael,

Just a thought, but how feasible would it to be to setup of database where readers of this blog could put in the Mint Codes that they know. I have several, but not nearly all of them. I would suggest leaving the code validation to users as once a code is know, it is a simple matter to validate it by using a google search. The problem is knowing the code in the first place.

Perhaps having the code isn't important from a collecting standpoint, but it does allow one to more easily use search engines to locate more information on a specific coin (sale prices, general info, etc.). Thoughts?

 
At May 21, 2009 at 9:41 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

sounds like that is a job for the US Mint and not a blog.

 
At May 22, 2009 at 8:55 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Are you serious? Since when has the Mint ever done anything for their customers?

 
At May 26, 2009 at 11:39 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Speculating has always been a great challenge.Our U.S. Mint produces what they speculate to be a sellout.Any time a sellout happens.They meet their expectations and make the Mint the most Revenue.Since the 2009 Presidential and proof clad sets have been largely over shadowed by the URL and the New Lincoln penny designs.The expectations were not fulfilled.Therefore, the only way to not have to melt everything down and lose their revenue.Was to market it with coins that are showing a larger demand.If this seems sneaky to you.Then just consider this.If they melt it down.They lose money in the contracts that are made with private companies who melt the money down.I think this proof set will meet the expectations of the Mint and sell out the remaining proof sets they have and maintain the expected revenue.If this does work.I would expect to see the silver proof be used in the same manner to meet expectations on that product as well.Melt downs can only be good for one thing.Lower then expected mintage and higher value as a result do to rarity.But melt downs are just that.A melt down of trust in our currency and a revenue loss to the Mint.Good thing Abe Lincoln has been around so long.He seems to revive the trust in our currency.I just hope he's not to late this time.I will buy one set.I'm glad I never bought the proof sets though.I was disappointed to much from the pull of the original Lincoln proof four coin set deal which was offered at 8.95 couple of months ago.I always wondered what happened to that deal.But now that I have seen the popularity over the months of the different clad coins.I understand just what the Mint might be doing to sell everything.At least these pennies will be 95% copper.So there is a plus side to this.And we will also get to see all four designs on the Lincoln.Errors will be very sought after and will probably draw a very high demand.Hmmmmm.I wonder if the mint knows that yet.Could be a new marketing approach.LOL

 
At May 29, 2009 at 11:31 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have a subscription to 10 sets for mondays release of the '09 proof set. Would like to see mint restore the FIFO system, but know they are probably not going to yet. Just hoping to see them soon in mail, I mean before the silver set release date LOL. $29.95 a set I well worth the invesment I think.
With all the hype over the lincon cents that are only uncirculated or in circulation and the low mintages on the rest of '09 coins the premiums for this and the silver set proofs ought to be very high.

 
At May 31, 2009 at 9:44 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I just checked the link to the mint subscription page for the upcoming proof set and it does not state the composition of the pennies will be copper. Although according to the description of the mint and silver proof sets, they will both have the copper pennies. I thought I had previously read the description at the mint site to include the copper pennies. Anyone know for sure?

 
At May 31, 2009 at 8:25 PM , Anonymous Dude said...

The US Mint has no mention of the "Copper Composition" pennies in the description for the 2009 Proof Set. However, for the 2009 Silver Proof Set the following is listed: "*Lincoln Cents contain an alloy consisting of 95% copper, 3% zinc and 2% tin that matches the alloy used in the original 1907 version."

The 2009 Proof Set will not contain the "Copper" pennies. If it did, the US Mint would have stated as fact as it would undoubtedly help sales.

Furthermore, one can obtain all 4 pennies from the 2009 proof set for under 20 bucks. If they were truly of the "copper variety, this Dude would expect to pay more then 20 bucks for the set.

This dude will still buy a handful of 2009 proof sets, but will save his us currency for the 2009 Silver Proof Sets with the Copper pennies.

ITDHO (In This Dudes Humble Opinion)

What do you dudes or dudets think?

 
At June 2, 2009 at 10:01 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I called the US Mint to verify if there would be 95% copper in the 2009 Proof Set - the person said they would be 95% copper in the proof set ... the Mint sure would make it easier if they included all the info in the description. we'll soon find out - if someone receives this set it would be nice to have the reassurance.

I notice on Ebay some are stating the Birthplace and Formative cents as "copper." I guess they wouldn't sell as quickly if they stated zinc with a teenie tiny bit of copper. Anybody have a guess how many proof sets will be minted? Here's a guess ... 1,000,000.

 
At June 2, 2009 at 12:18 PM , Blogger Michael said...

The subscription page is now showing information for the 2010 Proof Set, so the reference to the composition of the cents no longer appears.

I am not sure why the US Mint is not mentioning the composition on the main product page, but the 95% copper composition was confirmed to the numismatic press and stated in the June 8 issue of Coin World.

 
At June 4, 2009 at 7:34 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I got a confirmation last night that my proof sets are shipping.

 
At June 5, 2009 at 7:44 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I just got the Clad Proof Set today, and the COA states "Each Lincoln One-Cent coin has a composition of 95% copper, its original metal content when first introduced in 1909."

 
At June 6, 2009 at 3:21 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you.

 
At June 7, 2009 at 12:53 PM , Anonymous Dude said...

Thanks Dude!

Some dude plaese scan and post the COA for everyones reference.

(o:

"I just got the Clad Proof Set today, and the COA states "Each Lincoln One-Cent coin has a composition of 95% copper, its original metal content when first introduced in 1909."

 
At June 15, 2009 at 8:17 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

received my four 2009 proof sets june 11, one of the sets had a ding on one of the pennies. i returned the set for a replacement, cost of regular mail with insurance was $8.77. does the mint still reimburse any of the postage?

 
At June 15, 2009 at 8:41 AM , Blogger Michael said...

unfortunately the mint does not reimburse return postage.

 
At June 16, 2009 at 4:58 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

So, if I read all the comments on here and what is posted on the mint's web site, this is what I understand to be the case. And please correct me if I am wrong(which I usually am).
1. General circulation - there is a P & D minted cent NON COPPER.
2. Mint set - there is a P & D minted cent NON COPPER, but which is burnished.
3. Proof sets - there is a P & D minted cent NON COPPER, with the S mint mark
4. Silver proof sets - there is a P & D minted cent COPPER, with the S mint mark.
So if we figure it all out, here is what we have
1. 4 X 2 = 8
2. 4 X 2 = 8
3. 4 X 2 = 8
4. 4 X 2 = 8
---
32 different coins for just the Lincoln Cents.

 
At June 16, 2009 at 5:04 AM , Blogger Michael said...

Here's my understanding of the 2009 Lincoln Cents to be issued:

1. Circulating coins - P & D mintmark, non copper.

2. Proof coins - S mint mark, 95% copper
(the same proof coins would be in the regular proof set, silver proof set, and Lincoln Coin & Chronicles Set)

3. Satin Finish coins - P & D mintmark, 95% copper.
(these are in the Mint Set)

--------------------

1. 4 designs X 2 mints = 8
2. 4 designs X 1 mint = 4
3. 4 designs X 2 mints = 8

Total 20 different 2009 Lincoln Cents.

 
At July 25, 2009 at 12:38 PM , Blogger the x said...

ever year the proof set gets bigger and i wonder what year there will be an one lens proof set,in 1999 it was 2 lens,2007 was 3 lens and now 2009 it is 4 lens.will it be around 2030?

 
At July 25, 2009 at 12:44 PM , Blogger the x said...

silver proof sets are most likey to be rare so i would buy the silver proof set,look at the 1999 proof sets the silver is worth $400 and the clad is worth $165.

 

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