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Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar Rolls


The United States Mint will begin sales of the Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar Rolls on February 18, 2010 at 12:00 Noon ET. One week earlier, the 2010 Presidential Dollar Proof Set had gone on sale, which contains the proof version of the coin.

The obverse of each Millard Fillmore Dollar features his portrait along with the inscriptions "Millard Fillmore", "In God We Trust", "13th President", the years of his term "1850-1853". The reverse of the coin features a rendition of the Statue of Liberty with "United States of America" and the denomination "$1". Both the obverse and reverse were designed by Don Everhart.

The US Mint is offering 25-coin rolls from either the Philadelphia or Denver Mint. These rolls are packaged in custom US Mint wrappers that indicate the President, mint mark, and face value of the contents. The rolls are priced at $35.95 each, the same price as last year's Presidential Dollar rolls.

The two previous roll offerings featuring James K. Polk and Zachary Taylor remain available for sale on the US Mint's website. The latest available sales figures indicate the Polk Rolls sold 39,476 (P) and 38,220 (D) while the Taylor Rolls have sold 36,108 (P) and 34,627 (D).

Coin Update News has the full US Mint Sales Report. This represents the first report in two weeks, as figures were not issued last week.

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16 Comments:

At February 16, 2010 at 2:24 PM , Anonymous Brad said...

I wonder if the Mint will pull a fast one on us and limit the output of Fillmore rolls to catch us off-guard again. I can see them cutting these off at 25,000 rolls each (or actually taking orders for 32,000+ each, only to cancel 7,000+ orders to further feed the frenzy). Then, those of us still licking our wounds over buying the John Tyler and James K. Polk rolls will have something ELSE to kick ourselves over...NOT buying any Millard Fillmores!

 
At February 16, 2010 at 2:29 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I will pay $8,000 in cash in nonsequential unmarked bills for every Fillmore roll you can give me.


Oooops, no I wont- they're worthless!

 
At February 16, 2010 at 2:57 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I know this has nothing to do with the Fillmore rolls but with the Olympics in full force does anyone here have any idea what coins (if any) are worth buying from the Royal Canadian Mint to commemorate the 2010 Winter Games? I wanted to get at least a few different silver options but there are so many different ones to choose from and I'm lost. Anyone?

 
At February 16, 2010 at 9:39 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have a problem with something that is not at least 50% precious metal being called a coin. The mint primarily offers medals, bronze likenesses, tokens, and souvenir items. It no longer offers much in the way of coins. Dumbing down of America to where we now call what should be a token or a souvenir item a coin.

 
At February 17, 2010 at 9:20 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Mint should scrap the presidential dollar coins after this year (after Lincoln). But, knowing our govt and the way congress fails to act logically, we will be stuck for years and years with tons of ugly dollar coins which nobody wants, because the govt won't pull the dollar bill out of circulation. We already have tons of unwanted Sacegawea dollars and those are actually pretty coins. What makes them think these ugly presidential dollars will fare any better? They likely will never pull the dollar bill out of circulation so no matter how they package, market, and promote these dollar coins, they will never be successful.

 
At February 17, 2010 at 10:04 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The US Mint produces the coins while the Bureau of Engraving makes the dollar bills. They are two different departments and one can not tell the other what to do.
The people will have to tell the goverment that we don't want the dollar bills.

 
At February 17, 2010 at 11:03 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Off topic but why do PCGS coins go for a premium when you get toning and hues on them after collecting a while, new to collecting? Does NGC have the same problem? Michael it would be great if you can do a blog on grading services or is there a place I can get info?

 
At February 17, 2010 at 11:29 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was considering going to the Fillmore dedication ceremony but it turns out it's supposed to snow every day this week and the hotels up in that area are horrendous.

 
At February 17, 2010 at 2:23 PM , Blogger Lasloo said...

"I have a problem with something that is not at least 50% precious metal being called a coin."

Ah, so now I understand why everyone gives modern coinage a hard time. I've never been into coin collecting for the metal content (though I do appreciate it when its there), so it was never important to me whether it was mostly silver, gold, or whatever. I enjoyed the designs or the stories behind the design or the different die varieties or subtype changes in a coin over time.

I agree that the Presidential designs haven't been great, but I do enjoy collecting them as a way to learn more about U.S. history and our government. Oddly enough, I'm actually a little more interested in the non-popular Presidents since we don't know as much about them. For instance, Polk was a very under-rated President, but relatively pretty impressive. There's a whole time between Grant and McKinley that I think most people don't write enough about. How about the controversy behind the election of Hayes? Or the reasons behind the fact that we'll have TWO Grover Cleveland coins. I find that kind of stuff VERY interesting. And that's why I collect coins, both modern and older varieties.

 
At February 17, 2010 at 2:55 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Regarding Grover Cleveland, I hope the Mint gives us a different obverse design for both him and the Frances Cleveland gold coins, and not merely repeat the same picture on both coins while simply changing the number and dates of service. I guess it would be cheaper to do so, but we should at least be able to tell the two coins apart at a glance, instead of having to read the fine print!

 
At February 17, 2010 at 3:15 PM , Blogger Lasloo said...

I don't remember where I read it... but it was stated that yes, both the Presidential coins and First Spouse coins will have different designs.

 
At February 17, 2010 at 3:55 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I also noticed over the years that the PCGS graded coins are much easier to develop tones than NGC graded ones, even for gold coins. My first spouse gold coins in PCGS holders are developing pink-color tones, but nothing for the NGC graded ones. Michael and other collectors, do you know why?

 
At February 18, 2010 at 11:48 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I noticed that the Mint is using the product codes "PR1" and "PR2" for the P and D Millard Fillmore dollar rolls. What gives with that? Usually the product codes use the President's initials with a 2 or 4 after them. That hasn't always been the case, but more often than not it is. Where did the Mint pull those codes out of?

 
At February 18, 2010 at 4:15 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I bought some Fillmore coin today...
just to celebrate my fond memories of the many nights spent listening to all the great music at the Fillmore West in San Francisco during the summer of Love...

Goldilocks

 
At February 20, 2010 at 4:18 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

They should never stop making the Washington dollar bill. It looks good is a well-known symbol of our county. These dollar coins are good for use in Vegas if it ever revives and amusement parks where kids can collect them.

 
At February 23, 2010 at 6:54 PM , Anonymous marc anthony said...

@February 16, 2010 2:57 PM:

The RCM had a 3-coin Olympic silver maple set on sale for about a minute before selling out, mintage 4,000 units. USD price was $189 now going for >$300 on eBay and elsewhere.

I like the 2009 Thunderbird and 2010 Olympic silver maple leafs for bullion; nice designs and cheaper than SAEs but not likely to be a collectible (unless Canada wins the gold medal in hockey).

 

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